We Like Sound

March 15, 2012

We’re still on spring break! There’s fruit in my glass, and ice and other items in there, too. So while we’re all, um, waiting for the next show, here’s an activity to pass the time: Following are two samples of Wikipedia’s list of unexplained sounds, recorded by the NOAA’s Equatorial Pacific Ocean autonomous hydrophone array.

The first is called the bloop. You’ll hear some background noise, then the bloop about two seconds in. Note you are hearing it played back at 16x normal speed so in reality it is a very low sound. To quote the NOAA “… [it] was of sufficient amplitude to be heard on multiple sensors, at a range of over 5,000 km. The NOAA’s Dr. Christopher Fox does not believe its origin is man-made, such as a submarine or bomb, or familiar geological events such as volcanoes or earthquakes. While the audio profile of the Bloop does resemble that of a living creature, the source is a mystery both because it is different from known sounds and because it was several times louder than the loudest recorded animal, the blue whale.”

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Cool.

The next one is called the train: “… an unidentified sound recorded on March 5, 1997. The sound rises to a quasi-steady frequency. The origin of the sound is unknown.” This is also played at 16x original speed.

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Thanks to Wikipedia and the NOAA for dispersing this. Definitely have to sample one to use in an upcoming soundscape!

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